Grants

How to Apply
 

Humanities Texas awards grants to nonprofit organizations and governmental entities to support a wide range of public programs: lectures, panel discussions, and conferences; teacher institutes; reading- and film-discussion groups; interpretive exhibits; television and radio programming; film production; and interactive multimedia programming.

All funded programs are firmly grounded in the humanities and are directed to the general public, both adults and young people, outside of the regular school or college classroom. Programs targeting special audiences such as K–12 teachers, ethnic and community groups, or professional groups are also welcome.


Eligibility

Nonprofit organizations and state and local governmental entities are eligible to receive Humanities Texas support.

Grant Formats

Mini-grants

Mini-grants fund up to $1,500 of the costs associated with public humanities programs. These small grants, which are easy to apply for and administer, are particularly appropriate for funding a speaker and/or the rental of a traveling exhibition, including those provided by Humanities Texas.

Major grants for community projects

Major grants for community projects fund comprehensive public programs such as lectures, seminars, and conferences; book and film discussions; interpretive exhibitions and materials; town forums and civic discussions; and teacher workshops. Programs should reflect substantial participation by both humanities scholars and members of the target audience(s).

Major grants for media projects

Major grants for media projects fund film, radio, television, or interactive programming related to the humanities. Applicants may request funds for any phase of the project, including scripting, development, production, post-production, and in some cases, distribution and free public screenings. Humanities scholars should play an integral role in determining the content and approach of the project.

Application Deadlines

Mini-grant applications are accepted on a rolling basis, but applications must be received at least six weeks before project promotion begins. Decisions are made within ten business days of an application’s arrival in the Humanities Texas office.

Major grant applications are accepted twice each year. The spring deadline is March 15; the fall deadline is September 15. If the deadlne falls on a weekend, then the postmark deadline falls on the following Monday.

Grant Guidelines and Application Forms

Download all essential application materials. Please contact our staff if you would like us to send you paper copies of any of the files available here.

Assistance in Applying

Potential applicants are encouraged to contact Humanities Texas prior to submitting an application. Use the materials below as guides when preparing your application.

How Funding Decisions Are Made

The Humanities Texas Board of Directors reviews major grant proposals; the executive director and staff, with the authorization of the Board, review mini-grants. Projects are evaluated on the basis of Humanities Texas's organizational mission and grants guidelines. Of particular importance are the quality of each project's conception and design, the strength of its humanities component, and the extent to which it will meet the particular intellectual, cultural, or professional needs and interests of its target audience(s) in Texas. Priority is given to applications from Texas-based sponsoring organizations.

Questions about Grants

Call 512.440.1991 or email grants@humanitiestexas.org

Upcoming Application Deadlines

  • Preliminary materials for major grants and Howell RFP (August 15, 2014)
  • Final postmark deadline for major grants and Howell RFP (September 15, 2014)
  • Mini-grants (ongoing)
Tom Lea Month 2011
Many of the events that took place during Tom Lea Month 2011 were made possible with Humanities Texas support.
Whole Lotta Shakin'
In 2006, Humanities Texas supported A Whole Lotta Shakin', the Peabody Award-winning radio documentary series on the history of Rockabilly.
Bill Grosvenor
In 2004, Humanities Texas awarded a grant supporting Last Best Hope: A True Story of Escape, Evasion, and Remembrance, a film documenting the story of Abilene’s Bill Grosvenor, a P-47 Thunderbolt pilot protected by the Belgian Resistance after being shot down during World War II.