Events

November 9, 2015–March 20, 2016
Exhibition

In the 1930s, photographers working for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) captured unforgettable images of human fortitude and despair in the face of calamity. Nebraska photographer Bill Ganzel set out in the late 1970s to find and re-photograph Dust Bowl survivors for a book and exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition combines the FSA photographs and Ganzel’s interviews to create an eloquent story of human fortitude. For more information, contact the Dallas Historical Society at 214.421.4500.

Hall of State
3939 Grand Ave.
Dallas, TX 75210
December 15, 2015–
March 13, 2016
Exhibition

People’s Lives: A Celebration of the Human Spirit takes us down unfamiliar paths to rest stops, markets, workshops, restaurants, and private homes in locales that most of us may never visit. People’s Lives turns its viewers into world travelers whenever they pause to take in a picture. For more information, please contact the Aurora History Museum.

Aurora History Museum
15051 E. Alameda Parkway
Aurora, CO 80012
January 11–March 4, 2016
Exhibition

Melina Mara began photographing the thirteen women in the U.S. Senate in 2001, continuing as their number grew to fourteen in 2003. Changing the Face of Power: Women in the U.S. Senate, the exhibition based on her work, was created by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at The University of Texas at Austin, and is presented in partnership with the Humanities Texas traveling exhibitions program. For more information, contact the Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center at 308.432.6710.

Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center
1000 Main Street
Chadron, NE 69337
January 12 – June 25, 2016
Exhibition

Featuring photographs, facsimiles of landmark documents, and quotations by Dr. King and others engaged in the struggle for civil rights, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the Civil Rights Movement from the emergence of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 through the 1990s. For more information, contact the Museum of the Albemarle.

Museum of the Albemarle
501 South Water Street
Elizabeth City, NC 27909
January 18 – February 29, 2016
Exhibition

Photographer Susan Gaetz Duarte spent more than a year documenting the Beachy Amish Mennonite community of Lott, Texas, for her master’s thesis at The University of Texas at Austin. Though there have been other Mennonite settlements in Texas in the twentieth century, the Lott community has proven themselves with their longstanding, unceasing presence as well as their continued growth. They have endured because of their tenacity, community strength, and ability to adapt. This exhibition is by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin, presented in partnership with Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information, please contact the Sam Houston Memorial Museum.

Sam Houston Memorial Museum
1402 19th Street
Huntsville, TX 77340
January 22 – February 19, 2016
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Llano County Historical Museum.

Llano County Historical Museum
310 Besemer
Llano, TX 78643
January 25 – March 11, 2016
Exhibition

R. C. Hickman was a Dallas photographer whose thousands of images produced from 1949 to 1961 document aspects of life in an African American community in Texas. His photographs depict a community largely invisible to white Americans—thoroughly a part of mainstream America by virtue of accomplishment and lifestyle but excluded from it because of race. This exhibition was created by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin, and is presented in partnership with the Humanities Texas traveling exhibitions program. For more information, contact the Denton County Office of History and Culture.

Courthouse–on–the–Square
110 W. Hickory Street
Denton, TX 76201
January 27, 2016–March 7, 2016
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Heritage Society.

The Heritage Society
1100 Bagby St.
Houston, TX 77002
January 27–February 24, 2016
Exhibition

A celebratory survey of works by Latinos in the past thirty years, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition presents images of authors, books, movie stills, public presentations, and illustrations. It is based on an original exhibition at the University of Houston Library that documented a quarter century of Hispanic publishing in the United States. For more information, please contact the Lawrence W. Tyree Library.

Lawrence W. Tyree Library
3000 NW 83rd Street, Y-124
Gainesville, FL 32606
February 1–
February 29, 2016
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition explores the lives of Africans during the first three centuries of the American enterprise, with particular emphasis on how the slave trade created the prosperity of the New World and stamped the evolving society with indelible aspects of African culture. This exhibition features illustrations of paintings, watercolor sketches, details from panoramic panel and mural paintings, engravings, archival documents, color photographs of historic places, and maps and graphs of the origins and destinations of slaves. For more information, please contact the Rice County Historical Society at 620.257.3941.

Rice County Historical Society
105 West Lyons
Lyons, KS 67554

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