Events

November 25, 2014–
January 31, 2015
Exhibition

Forgotten Gateway: Coming to America Through Galveston Island, a new Humanities Texas traveling exhibition presented in collaboration with the Bullock Texas State History Museum, explores the Port of Galveston's role in the story of 19th and 20th century immigration to the United States and considers universal themes of immigration including leaving home, encountering danger, confronting discrimination, and navigating bureaucracy. For more information, contact The Heritage Society at 713.655.1912.

The Heritage Society
1100 Bagby Street
Houston, TX 77002
December 29, 2014–
February 7, 2015
Exhibition

Miguel Covarrubias (1904–1957) was one of the foremost Mexican artists of the twentieth century. A quintessential humanist, he made important contributions in the fields of anthropology, archaeology, theater, and dance. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition focuses on the sophisticated caricatures that made Covarrubias famous. His caricatures provide a unique window into the cultural and political milieu of the 1920s and 1930s. For more information contact the Del Rio Council for the Arts at 830.775.0888.

Del Rio Council for the Arts Gallery
120 E. Garfield St.
Del Rio, TX 78840
January 12–March 6, 2015
Exhibition

Featuring photographs, facsimiles of landmark documents, and quotations by Dr. King and others engaged in the struggle for civil rights, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the Civil Rights Movement from the emergence of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 through the 1990s. For more information, contact the Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center at 308.432.6710.

Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center
1000 Main Street
Chadron, NE 69337
January 12–
February 7, 2015
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition looks at early Texas buildings for information about settlers' visions of community and progress and their accommodation to the physical demands and economic realities of everyday life. For more information, contact the Schreiner Mansion.

Schreiner Mansion Historic Site and Education Center
226 Earl Garrett
Kerrville, TX 78028
January 14–March 1, 2015
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition explores the lives of Africans during the first three centuries of the American enterprise, with particular emphasis on how the slave trade created the prosperity of the New World and stamped the evolving society with indelible aspects of African culture. This exhibition features illustrations of paintings, watercolor sketches, details from panoramic panel and mural paintings, engravings, archival documents, color photographs of historic places, and maps and graphs of the origins and destinations of slaves. For more information, please contact the Confederate Reunion Grounds.

Confederate Reunion Grounds
1738 FM 2705
Mexia, TX 76667
January 22–
February 19, 2015
Exhibition

The annexation of Texas as the twenty-eighth member of the United States of America had a profound impact on world events and the course of democracy in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition narrates the story of Texas as a Mexican colony and Republic, its campaign to join the United States, the vote for annexation, and the consequences of that vote. For more information, please contact the Benbrook Public Library.

Benbrook Public Library
1065 Mercedes St.
Benbrook, TX 76126
February 1–March 20, 2015
Exhibition

The annexation of Texas as the twenty-eighth member of the United States of America had a profound impact on world events and the course of democracy in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition narrates the story of Texas as a Mexican colony and Republic, its campaign to join the United States, the vote for annexation, and the consequences of that vote. For more information, please contact the Brazoria County Historical Museum.

Brazoria County Historical Museum
100 East Cedar St.
Angleton, TX 77515
February 1–March 1, 2015
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Gage Hotel.

Gage Hotel
108 Northwest 2nd
Marathon, TX 79842
February 1–February 8, 2015
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition explores the lives of Africans during the first three centuries of the American enterprise, with particular emphasis on how the slave trade created the prosperity of the New World and stamped the evolving society with indelible aspects of African culture. This exhibition features illustrations of paintings, watercolor sketches, details from panoramic panel and mural paintings, engravings, archival documents, color photographs of historic places, and maps and graphs of the origins and destinations of slaves. For more information, please contact the Windsor Village United Methodist Church.

Windsor Village United Methodist Church
6011 West Orem Dr.
Houston, TX 77085
February 2–February 27, 2015
Exhibition

This exhibition addresses the question posed by African American poet Countee Cullen in 1926: “What is Africa to me?”  This exhibition provides a number of examples from twentieth-century African American artists—both trained and untrained—that visually respond to this question. These modern artists draw heavily on African influence, while simultaneously reinterpreting it for a different time and place. The exhibition surveys the work of forty-five artists, including unknown Africans and Haitians, through photographs, posters, and concise texts. For more information, contact the Palo Alto College Library.

Palo Alto College Library
1400 W Villaret Blvd
San Antonio, TX 78224

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