Events

March 1–August 14, 2015
Exhibition

In the 1930s, photographers working for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) captured unforgettable images of human fortitude and despair in the face of calamity. Nebraska photographer Bill Ganzel set out in the late 1970s to find and re-photograph Dust Bowl survivors for a book and exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition combines the FSA photographs and Ganzel’s interviews to create an eloquent story of human fortitude. For more information contact the XIT Museum.

XIT Museum
108 E. 5th Street
Dalhart, TX 79022
April 17–June 4, 2015
Exhibition

This exhibition presents photographs by renowned documentary photographer Russell Lee and draws from the magnificent archive that he donated to the Briscoe Center for American History just prior to his death in 1986. This exhibition offers a rare glimpse into the remarkable images he produced in 1935 and 1936 when he first took up a camera and goes on to highlight the vast body of important work that Lee produced from 1947 through 1977. The exhibition was created by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin, and is presented in partnership with the Humanities Texas traveling exhibitions program. For more information contact the Brazoria County Historical Museum.

Brazoria County Historical Museum
100 East Cedar St.
Angleton, TX 77515
May 11– June 1, 2015
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition looks at early Texas buildings for information about settlers' visions of community and progress and their accommodation to the physical demands and economic realities of everyday life. For more information, contact the Childress County Heritage Museum. 

Childress County Heritage Museum
210 3rd St NW
Childress, TX 79201
May 15–July 25, 2015
Exhibition

William Shakespeare is the quintessential subject for a humanities program. Born into a culture formed by the great humanists of the Renaissance, he peopled the stage with characters that embody both the glory and riddle of being human. Shakespeare draws primarily from print resources of the Harry Ransom Center and production photographs of the Department of Theater and Dance at The University of Texas at Austin. For more information, please contact the Longview Public Library.

Longview Public Library
222 W. Cotton Street
Longview, TX 75601
May 16–June 6, 2015
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Coleman Public Library.

Coleman Public Library
402 commercial
Coleman, TX 76834
May 25, 2015–July 3, 2015
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Pioneer Museum.

Vereins Kirche
101 West Main Street
Fredericksburg, TX 78624
June 1–August 24, 2015
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition provides a historical overview of U.S. Latino participation in World War II and features historical photographs from the U.S. Latino & Latina WWII Oral History Project archives and contemporary photographs of men and women of the WWII generation by photojournalist Valentino Mauricio. It focuses on individual stories that reveal larger themes such as citizenship and civil rights and features excerpts from the more than five hundred oral history interviews that were part of the project. For more information, contact the Daingerfield State Park.

Daingerfield State Park
455 Park Road 17
Daingerfield, TX 75638
June 1–July 31, 2015
Exhibition

Forgotten Gateway: Coming to America Through Galveston Island, a new Humanities Texas traveling exhibition presented in collaboration with the Bullock Texas State History Museum, explores the Port of Galveston's role in the story of 19th and 20th century immigration to the United States and considers universal themes of immigration including leaving home, encountering danger, confronting discrimination, and navigating bureaucracy. For more information, contact the Midland County Library.

Midland County Library
301 W. Missouri
Midland, TX 79701
June 4–July 9, 2015
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition looks at the remarkable life and achievements of one of America’s most beloved personalities. Besides serving his country as a skillful diplomat and negotiator, Benjamin Franklin was a scientist, inventor, entrepreneur, humorist and philanthropist whose wisdom and wit continue to inspire and entertain us more than three hundred years after his birth. Franklin was dedicated to making the world a better place and himself a better person.  His is the quintessential American success story. For more information, please contact the Old Jail Museum Complex.

Old Jail Museum Complex
5th & Elm
Palo Pinto, TX 76584
June 19–August 15, 2015
Exhibition

R. C. Hickman was a Dallas photographer whose thousands of images produced from 1949 to 1961 document aspects of life in an African American community in Texas. His photographs depict a community largely invisible to white Americans—thoroughly a part of mainstream America by virtue of accomplishment and lifestyle but excluded from it because of race. This exhibition was created by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin, and is presented in partnership with the Humanities Texas traveling exhibitions program. For more information, contact the Dallas Historical Society at 214.421.4500.

Hall of State
3939 Grand Ave.
Dallas, TX 75210

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