Events

September 29, 2016, 5:00–8:00 p.m.
Panel discussion

Join the Department of History at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and Humanities Texas for a discussion about the election of 1876 and its contemporary significance.

Aula Canaria Auditorium, UTSA Downtown Campus
501 W César E Chávez Blvd
San Antonio, TX 78207
August 1–October 7, 2016
Exhibition

This exhibition addresses the question posed by African American poet Countee Cullen in 1926: “What is Africa to me?”  This exhibition provides a number of examples from twentieth-century African American artists—both trained and untrained—that visually respond to this question. These modern artists draw heavily on African influence, while simultaneously reinterpreting it for a different time and place. The exhibition surveys the work of forty-five artists, including unknown Africans and Haitians, through photographs, posters, and concise texts. For more information, contact the Inman E. Page Library.

Inman E. Page Library
712 Lee Drive
Jefferson City, MO 65101
August 22–
October 14, 2016
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition examines the document upon which our country was founded: the United States Constitution. Written to "secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our Posterity," the Constitution is short, simple, and often ambiguous. As the blueprint for our nation’s government, it represents a set of beliefs and a way of life. This exhibition seeks to explain the immense importance of a document that holds answers to challenging questions of government and features twelve panels charting the progress of former colonies to a united nation. For more information contact the Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center at 308.432.6710.

Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center
1000 Main Street
Chadron, NE 69337
September 1–
October 7, 2016
Exhibition

Miguel Covarrubias (1904–1957) was one of the foremost Mexican artists of the twentieth century. A quintessential humanist, he made important contributions in the fields of anthropology, archaeology, theater, and dance. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition focuses on the sophisticated caricatures that made Covarrubias famous. His caricatures provide a unique window into the cultural and political milieu of the 1920s and 1930s. For more information contact the Old Jail Museum Complex.

Old Jail Museum Complex
5th & Elm
Palo Pinto, TX 76484
September 5 – 30, 2016
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition addresses the difficult topic of censorship. Censorship has been practiced for nearly as long as there have been materials to censor. The Bonfire of Liberties gives an overview of censorship in its various guises over time. Furthermore, it examines the struggle between those who want to censor difficult, controversial, and revolutionary material from sensitive viewers and those who want to protect the freedoms of all people to read, view, and think for themselves. Viewers may be surprised to learn just how many of their favorite books and plays have been censored at some point in history. For more information, contact the Marion County Public Library.

Marion County Public LIbrary
321 Monroe Street
Fairmont, WV 26554
September 6 – October 18, 2016
Exhibition

Featuring thirty-eight photographs paired with excerpts from his dynamic speeches, interviews, and authoritative writings, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition documents the full course of Chávez’s remarkable career and examines the life experiences and philosophical influences that drove him to dedicate himself fully to improving the lives of American farm workers. For more information, contact the San Luis Library.

San Luis Library
2951 S. 21st Drive
Yuma, AZ 85364
September 12–
October 21, 2016
Exhibition

The Texas-Mexico border is more than a line between two countries. It is a realm unto itself with a culture of its own, shaped by the millions who choose to live and work there. The border is a cradle of hope—and anxiety—for the well-being of both Mexico and the United States. Border Studies features images by eight gifted photographers and maps showing historical relocations of the border, highlighting the vitality of places, people, and patterns of culture along the Texas-Mexico border. For more information, contact the Denton County Office of History and Culture.

Courthouse–on–the–Square
110 W. Hickory Street
Denton, TX 76201
September 15 – October 10, 2016
Exhibition

The Texas-Mexico border is more than a line between two countries. It is a realm unto itself with a culture of its own, shaped by the millions who choose to live and work there. The border is a cradle of hope—and anxiety—for the well-being of both Mexico and the United States. Border Studies features images by eight gifted photographers and maps showing historical relocations of the border, highlighting the vitality of places, people, and patterns of culture along the Texas-Mexico border. For more information, contact the Pharr Memorial Library.

Pharr Memorial Library
121 E Cherokee Avenue
Pharr, TX 78577
September 15–
October 13, 2016
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Forest Hill Public Library.

Forest Hill Public Library
6962 Forest Hill Dr.
Forest Hill, TX 76140
September 15–
October 15, 2016
Exhibition

A celebratory survey of works by Latinos in the past thirty years, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition presents images of authors, books, movie stills, public presentations, and illustrations. It is based on an original exhibition at the University of Houston Library that documented a quarter century of Hispanic publishing in the United States. For more information, please contact the Tahita Fulkerson Library.

Tahita Fulkerson Library
300 Trinity River Circle
Fort Worth, TX 76102

Pages