Events

January 2–March 31, 2017
Exhibition

Featuring photographs, facsimiles of landmark documents, and quotations by Dr. King and others engaged in the struggle for civil rights, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the Civil Rights Movement from the emergence of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 through the 1990s. For more information, contact the Inman E. Page Library.

Inman E. Page Library
712 Lee Drive
Jefferson City, MO 65101
January 16 – February 28, 2017
Exhibition

Featuring photographs, facsimiles of landmark documents, and quotations by Dr. King and others engaged in the struggle for civil rights, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the Civil Rights Movement from the emergence of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 through the 1990s. For more information, contact the Sam Houston Memorial Museum.

Sam Houston Memorial Museum
1402 19th Street
Huntsville, TX 77340
January 20 – March 12, 2017
Exhibition

Photographer Rick Williams has captured images of workers and work places in three diverse industries that constitute the three pillars of the Texas economy: ranching, oil, and technology. Working Hands: An Exhibition of Photographs by Rick Williams features forty finely detailed photographs that evoke a powerful sense of what it must feel like to engage in the work depicted, as well as the unique character each industry brings to the Texas landscape. For more information, contact the Grapevine Convention & Visitors Bureau.

Grapevine Convention & Visitors Bureau
636 S. Main St
Grapevine, TX 76051
February 1 – 28, 2017
Exhibition

Based on an exhibition organized by the Amon Carter Museum and The University of Texas at Arlington Library, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition spans the mapmaking enterprise, beginning with the earliest known map to show the Texas edge of the Gulf (1512) and ending with an 1873 map of Texas showing the right of way granted to railroads. For more information, please contact the Whitehead Memorial Museum.

Whitehead Memorial Museum
1308 S. Main Street
Del Rio, TX 78840
February 1 – March 1, 2017
Exhibition

Featuring photographs, facsimiles of landmark documents, and quotations by Dr. King and others engaged in the struggle for civil rights, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the Civil Rights Movement from the emergence of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 through the 1990s. For more information, contact the Laurel County Public Library.

Laurel County Public Library
120 College Park Drive
London, KY 40741
February 1–February 28, 2017
Exhibition

In the 1930s, photographers working for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) captured unforgettable images of human fortitude and despair in the face of calamity. Nebraska photographer Bill Ganzel set out in the late 1970s to find and re-photograph Dust Bowl survivors for a book and exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition combines the FSA photographs and Ganzel’s interviews to create an eloquent story of human fortitude. For more information contact the Murrell Library.

Murrell Library
500 East College St.
Marshall, MO 65340
February 1–28, 2017
Exhibition

This exhibition addresses the question posed by African American poet Countee Cullen in 1926: “What is Africa to me?”  This exhibition provides a number of examples from twentieth-century African American artists—both trained and untrained—that visually respond to this question. These modern artists draw heavily on African influence, while simultaneously reinterpreting it for a different time and place. The exhibition surveys the work of forty-five artists, including unknown Africans and Haitians, through photographs, posters, and concise texts. For more information, contact the Haggard Library.

Haggard Library
2501 Coit Rd
Plano, TX 75075
February 2 – April 24, 2017
Exhibition

Forgotten Gateway: Coming to America Through Galveston Island, a new Humanities Texas traveling exhibition presented in collaboration with the Bullock Texas State History Museum, explores the Port of Galveston's role in the story of 19th and 20th century immigration to the United States and considers universal themes of immigration including leaving home, encountering danger, confronting discrimination, and navigating bureaucracy. For more information, contact The Bryan Museum.

The Bryan Museum
1315 21st St.
Galveston, TX 77550
February 6–March 3, 2017
Exhibition

In the 1840s, German immigrants began settling at New Braunfels, Fredericksburg, Sisterdale, and other locations in Central Texas, imparting a distinctive character to these communities. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features reproductions of archival photographs, newspaper headlines, maps, and paintings that tell the story of a people remarkable for individual and communal industry in setting down roots and adapting ways of the old country to life in a new world. For more information, please contact the Pearce Museum at Navarro College.

Pearce Museum at Navarro College
3100 W. Collin St.
Corsicana, TX 75110
February 11 – May 20, 2017
Exhibition

Melina Mara began photographing the thirteen women in the U.S. Senate in 2001, continuing as their number grew to fourteen in 2003. Changing the Face of Power: Women in the U.S. Senate, the exhibition based on her work, was created by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at The University of Texas at Austin, and is presented in partnership with the Humanities Texas traveling exhibitions program. For more information, please contact the Bell County Museum.

Bell County Museum
201 N. Main Street
Belton, TX 76513

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