Events

June 20 – July 31, 2018
Exhibition

Forgotten Gateway: Coming to America Through Galveston Island, a new Humanities Texas traveling exhibition presented in collaboration with the Bullock Texas State History Museum, explores the Port of Galveston's role in the story of 19th and 20th century immigration to the United States and considers universal themes of immigration including leaving home, encountering danger, confronting discrimination, and navigating bureaucracy. For more information, contact the Bosque Museum.

Bosque Museum
301 South Avenue Q
Clifton, TX 76634
June 26 – July 31, 2018
Exhibition

Photographer Rick Williams has captured images of workers and work places in three diverse industries that constitute the three pillars of the Texas economy: ranching, oil, and technology. Working Hands: An Exhibition of Photographs by Rick Williams features forty finely detailed photographs that evoke a powerful sense of what it must feel like to engage in the work depicted, as well as the unique character each industry brings to the Texas landscape. For more information, contact the River Valley Pioneer Museum.

River Valley Pioneer Museum
118 North 2nd St.
Canadian, TX 79014
June 29 – August 8, 2018
Exhibition

In the 1840s, German immigrants began settling at New Braunfels, Fredericksburg, Sisterdale, and other locations in Central Texas, imparting a distinctive character to these communities. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features reproductions of archival photographs, newspaper headlines, maps, and paintings that tell the story of a people remarkable for individual and communal industry in setting down roots and adapting ways of the old country to life in a new world. For more information, please contact the Heritage House Museum.

Heritage House Museum
901 Old Austin Hutto Road
Pflugerville, TX 78660
July 1 – 31, 2018
Exhibition

Drawn from files of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service archives at Texas A&M University, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition uses photographs and explanatory texts to convey a sense of the lives of rural Texas women, helpful programs of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Extension Service, and the changes that swept across rural Texas in the Great Depression and World War II. For more information, contact the Cleburne Friends of the Cultural Arts.

Cleburne Friends of the Cultural Arts
425 Granbury Street
Cleburne, TX 76033
August 1 – 31, 2018
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Cleburne Friends of the Cultural Arts.

Cleburne Friends of the Cultural Arts
425 Granbury Street
Cleburne, TX 76033
August 11 – September 15, 2018
Exhibition

Drawn from files of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service archives at Texas A&M University, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition uses photographs and explanatory texts to convey a sense of the lives of rural Texas women, helpful programs of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Extension Service, and the changes that swept across rural Texas in the Great Depression and World War II. For more information, contact the Old Jail Museum Complex.

Old Jail Museum Complex
5th & Elm
Palo Pinto, TX 76484
September 1 – October 31, 2018
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition provides a historical overview of U.S. Latino participation in World War II and features historical photographs from the U.S. Latino & Latina WWII Oral History Project archives and contemporary photographs of men and women of the WWII generation by photojournalist Valentino Mauricio. It focuses on individual stories that reveal larger themes such as citizenship and civil rights and features excerpts from the more than five hundred oral history interviews that were part of the project. For more information, contact the USS Kidd Veterans Museum.

USS Kidd Veterans Museum
305 South River Road
Baton Rouge, LA 70802
September 8-
December 29, 2018
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Bell County Museum.

Bell County Museum
201 N. Main Street
Belton, TX 76513
September 14 – October 17, 2018
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Harris County Public Library – Lone Star College.

Harris County Public Library
9191 Barker Cypress Road
Cypress, TX 77433
January 2 – 31, 2019
Exhibition

Forgotten Gateway: Coming to America Through Galveston Island, a new Humanities Texas traveling exhibition presented in collaboration with the Bullock Texas State History Museum, explores the Port of Galveston's role in the story of 19th and 20th century immigration to the United States and considers universal themes of immigration including leaving home, encountering danger, confronting discrimination, and navigating bureaucracy. For more information, contact the Spellman Museum of Forney History.

Spellman Museum of Forney History
200 S. Bois d'Arc
Forney, TX 75126

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