Exhibitions

Citizens at Last: The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas
 

Suffragists marched with their daughters in the Votes for Women parade in New York City, May 4, 1912. Courtesy Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress.

“The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” — The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Beginning in the nineteenth century, thousands of women across the United States campaigned relentlessly for woman suffrage—the right for women to vote. The passage of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920 was a watershed moment and the single largest expansion of voting rights in American history, but not all women gained the right to vote. Millions of women of color were still barred from the polls, taking nearly fifty more years and a new generation of activists to make the promise of the amendment a reality for many Americans. Citizens at Last: The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas focuses on the decades-long fight for woman suffrage in Texas with panel topics covering the national beginnings of the movement, early Texas leaders, transnational networks, anti-suffrage sentiments, segregated suffrage, and, the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment. 

Exhibition

Based on publications and historical research about woman suffrage by Dr. Jessica Brannon-Wranosky and inspired by the book Citizens at Last: The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas and an earlier exhibition of the same name created by the Woman's Collection at Texas Woman's University Library, this freestanding exhibition uses archival photographs, newspaper clippings, cartoons, and texts to display the struggle for woman suffrage in Texas. Panel topics include:

  • Texas Beginnings
  • Reconstruction
  • The Public Crusade
  • A State Association
  • Suffrage Society Plan
  • Transnational Networks
  • Anti-Suffrage Sentiment
  • The Winning Plan
  • Primary Suffrage
  • Segregated Suffrage
  • The Nineteenth Amendment
  • The Long Voting Rights Movement

Exhibition Format

Freestanding 
LanguageEnglish
Content7 double-sided panels (24” x 47”)
16 support legs (78” tall)
Space Requirements150 square feet of floor space (12’ x 8’)
Shipping Weight and DimensionsTravels in 2 plastic cases:
  • 41” x 51” x 11” - 125 lbs.
  • 41” x 51” x 11” - 125 lbs.
Rental Fee*$550*
Rental Period4 weeks

*Rental fees are based primarily on the cost of shipping. Prices may vary based on current fuel surcharges or venue location within the state of Texas. Out-of-state rentals are priced on an individual basis. Please call for a rental fee quote specific to your venue.

Publicity Materials

Press release

A press release is available for promoting this exhibition at your venue. Please contact the exhibitions coordinator to request an electronic copy. Please allow 2-3 business days for the exhibitions coordinator to process your request.

Publicity image

A publicity image is available for promoting this exhibition at your venue. Please contact the exhibitions coordinator to request an electronic file of this image. Please allow 2-3 business days for the exhibitions coordinator to process your request.

Humanities Texas logos

Logo files are also available for download from the logo page.

Book Now or Receive a Quote

To book an exhibition or receive a quote, please complete the online rental form.

Questions and Rental Information

Call 512.440.1991 or email
exhibitions@humanitiestexas.org

2021-2022 Bookings

Longview Public Library
Longview, TX
12/18/2020—01/29/2021

Harrison County Historical Museum
Marshall, TX
04/05/2021—05/04/2021

Sam Houston Memorial Museum
Huntsville, TX
06/07/2021—08/07/2021

The Museum of American Architecture & Decorative Arts
Houston, TX
09/06/2021—10/04/2021

Jefferson Historical Society & Museum
Jefferson, TX
10/15/2021—11/12/2021

Irving Archives and Museum
Irving, TX
02/20/2022—03/31/2022

Lone Star College and Harris County Public Library
Cypress, TX
04/12/2022—05/10/2022

On Display

The Campus Camera, April 31, 1915. Courtesy The Texas Collection, Baylor University Library.