Events

March 6–July 11, 2021
Exhibition

Capturing the sweeping visual imagery of the original miniseries, the Lonesome Dove exhibition presents classic images taken during filming by Bill Wittliff, renowned photographer, writer, and executive producer (with Suzanne De Passe) of Lonesome Dove. The images, however, are worlds apart from ordinary production stills, depicting an extraordinary union of art, literature, and history. For more information contact the Irving Arts Center.

Irving Arts Center
3333 N. MacArthur Blvd.
Irving, TX 75062
May 26–
September 28, 2021
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition provides a historical overview of U.S. Latino participation in World War II and features historical photographs from the U.S. Latino & Latina WWII Oral History Project archives and contemporary photographs of men and women of the WWII generation by photojournalist Valentino Mauricio. It focuses on individual stories that reveal larger themes such as citizenship and civil rights and features excerpts from the more than five hundred oral history interviews that were part of the project. For more information, contact the McAllen Heritage Center.

McAllen Heritage Center
301 S. Main St
McAllen, TX 78501
June 7–August 7, 2021
Exhibition

Created to celebrate the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features archival photographs, newspaper clippings, cartoons, cards, and texts detailing the struggle in Texas. For more information, contact the Sam Houston Memorial Museum.

Sam Houston Memorial Museum
1402 19th St.
Huntsville, TX 77340
June 8–July 20, 2021
Exhibition

The annexation of Texas as the twenty-eighth member of the United States of America had a profound impact on world events and the course of democracy in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition narrates the story of Texas as a Mexican colony and Republic, its campaign to join the United States, the vote for annexation, and the consequences of that vote. For more information, please contact the Rockwall County Historical Foundation Museum.

Rockwall County Historical Foundation Museum
901 East Washington St.
Rockwall, TX 75087
June 14–July 14, 2021
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition is both a cartoon history of Texas politics and a history of political cartooning in Texas.  It tells the story of one hundred years of events in Texas from 1890–1990 using political cartoons and informative text. This exhibition serves as a compilation of the visual commentaries of journalists about the issues and people most important to Texans during the one hundred year period. For more information contact the Kerr Regional History Center.

Kerr Regional History Center
425 Water St
Kerrville, TX 78028
June 29–July 27, 2021
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition looks at early Texas buildings for information about settlers' visions of community and progress and their accommodation to the physical demands and economic realities of everyday life. For more information, contact the River Valley Pioneer Museum

River Valley Pioneer Museum
118 North 2nd St.
Canadian, TX 79014
June 30–
August 11, 2021
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the East Texas Oil Museum.

East Texas Oil Museum at Kilgore College
1301 S. Henderson Blvd
Kilgore, TX 75662
July 8–
August 8, 2021
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Armstrong County Museum.

Armstrong County Museum
120 Trice St.
Claude, TX 79019
July 10–August 14, 2021
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the East Texas Oil Museum.

East Texas Oil Museum at Kilgore College
1301 S. Henderson Blvd
Kilgore, TX 75662
August 1–31, 2021
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the vitality and breadth of creative writing in Texas from the mid-twentieth century to the turn of the twenty-first century. It provides an overview of the literary accomplishments of Texas writers in a series of panels featuring portraits of authors, books, workplaces, narrative settings, and evocative quotations. For more information, please contact the Nicholas P. Sims Library.

Nicholas P. Sims Library
515 West Main St.
Waxahachie, TX 75165

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