Events

September 8-
December 29, 2018
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Bell County Museum.

Bell County Museum
201 N. Main Street
Belton, TX 76513
September 10, 2018–
January 7, 2019
Exhibition

State Fair is a visual distillation of Arthur Grace's photographic odyssey through fairs in ten states—California, Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Texas, and Virginia. Time and again, regardless of geographical location, Grace's images deftly capture the strange mixture of the traditional, the kitsch, and the off-the-wall that is unique to these annual gatherings, which began as a celebration of rural American life and have evolved into super-sized extravaganzas. State Fair is an exhibition by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at The University of Texas at Austin, presented in partnership with Humanities Texas. For further information regarding this event, please contact the Dr Pepper Museum & Free Enterprise Institute.

Dr. Pepper Museum & Free Enterprise Institute
300 South 5th Street
Waco, TX 76701
September 17 – December 7, 2018
Exhibition

Through renowned photojournalist James “Spider” Martin's camera and the words of Congressman John Lewis, former head of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), March to Freedom follows a determined group of marchers, both black and white, as they tried on three different occasions in March 1965 to take their cause to the steps of the Alabama Statehouse in Montgomery. March to Freedom is an exhibition by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at The University of Texas at Austin and the LBJ Presidential Library, presented in partnership with Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information about this event, please contact the Bellevue College Library.

Bellevue College
3000 Landerholm Circle SE
Bellevue, WA 98007
November 1 – 30, 2018
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the vitality and breadth of creative writing in Texas from the mid-twentieth century to the turn of the twenty-first century. It provides an overview of the literary accomplishments of Texas writers in a series of panels featuring portraits of authors, books, workplaces, narrative settings, and evocative quotations. For more information, please contact the Livingston Municipal Library.

Livingston Municipal Library
707 North Tyler Ave.
Livingston, TX 77351
December 3, 2018–
January 11, 2019
Exhibition

On the morning of June 7, 1998, the body of James Byrd Jr. was discovered in front of an African American church near Jasper, Texas. James Byrd was the victim of a hate crime that shocked and devastated the small East Texas town. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition explores the impact of the murder on the community and emphasizes the vital role local ministers played in keeping the peace in the days and months following Byrd's death. For more information, contact the Davis Library.

Davis Library
7501-B Independence Pkwy
Plano, TX 75025
December 17, 2018 – January 21, 2019
Exhibition

Through renowned photojournalist James “Spider” Martin's camera and the words of Congressman John Lewis, former head of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), March to Freedom follows a determined group of marchers, both black and white, as they tried on three different occasions in March 1965 to take their cause to the steps of the Alabama Statehouse in Montgomery. March to Freedom is an exhibition by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at The University of Texas at Austin and the LBJ Presidential Library, presented in partnership with Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information about this event, please contact the Linda Vista Branch Library.

Linda Vista Branch Library
2160 Ulric Street
San Diego, CA 92111
January 2–31, 2019
Exhibition

Forgotten Gateway: Coming to America Through Galveston Island, a new Humanities Texas traveling exhibition presented in collaboration with the Bullock Texas State History Museum, explores the Port of Galveston's role in the story of 19th and 20th century immigration to the United States and considers universal themes of immigration including leaving home, encountering danger, confronting discrimination, and navigating bureaucracy. For more information, contact the Spellman Museum of Forney History.

Spellman Museum of Forney History
200 S. Bois d'Arc
Forney, TX 75126
January 14 – May 10, 2019
Exhibition

Created to celebrate the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features archival photographs, newspaper clippings, cartoons, cards, and texts detailing the struggle in Texas. For more information, contact the Dr. Pepper Museum & Free Enterprise Institute.

Dr. Pepper Museum & Free Enterprise Institute
300 South 5th Street
Waco, TX 76701
February 1–
March 8, 2019
Exhibition

Featuring photographs, facsimiles of landmark documents, and quotations by Dr. King and others engaged in the struggle for civil rights, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition surveys the Civil Rights Movement from the emergence of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 through the 1990s. For more information, contact the Courthouse-on-the-Square.

Courthouse-on-the-Square
110 W. Hickory Street
Denton, TX 76201
February 1 – March 1, 2019
Exhibition

The availability of books and the spread of literacy profoundly influenced the discovery of the New World. Looking for people, places, and things that were described in books, explorers defined their encounters by referring to names and ideas from popular stories and ancient legends. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition will encourage people to think about the power of stories and the lure of new found lands. This exhibition highlights the ways in which books determined what people looked for in the New World and how they interpreted what they did see. For more information, contact the Wells Branch Community Library.

Wells Branch Community Library
15001 Wells Port Cr.
Austin, TX 78728

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