Events

July 23 – September 3, 2018
Exhibition

Miguel Covarrubias (1904–1957) was one of the foremost Mexican artists of the twentieth century. A quintessential humanist, he made important contributions in the fields of anthropology, archaeology, theater, and dance. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition focuses on the sophisticated caricatures that made Covarrubias famous. His caricatures provide a unique window into the cultural and political milieu of the 1920s and 1930s. For more information contact the Haggard Library.

Plano Public Library–Haggard Library
2501 Coid Road
Plano, TX 75075
August 1 – 31, 2018
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Cleburne Friends of the Cultural Arts.

Cleburne Friends of the Cultural Arts
425 Granbury Street
Cleburne, TX 76033
August 8 – September 5, 2018
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition uses paintings, lithographs, sketches, letters, diaries, sheet music, print documents, and artifacts from museums and libraries in both the United States and Mexico to narrate the story of the often overlooked U.S.-Mexican War. For more information, contact the Poundhouse Farmhouse Museum.

Poundhouse Farmhouse Museum
570 Founder’s Park Rd.
Dripping Springs, TX 78620
August 11 – September 15, 2018
Exhibition

Drawn from files of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service archives at Texas A&M University, this Humanities Texas traveling exhibition uses photographs and explanatory texts to convey a sense of the lives of rural Texas women, helpful programs of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Extension Service, and the changes that swept across rural Texas in the Great Depression and World War II. For more information, contact the Old Jail Museum Complex.

Old Jail Museum Complex
5th & Elm
Palo Pinto, TX 76484
September 1 – October 31, 2018
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition provides a historical overview of U.S. Latino participation in World War II and features historical photographs from the U.S. Latino & Latina WWII Oral History Project archives and contemporary photographs of men and women of the WWII generation by photojournalist Valentino Mauricio. It focuses on individual stories that reveal larger themes such as citizenship and civil rights and features excerpts from the more than five hundred oral history interviews that were part of the project. For more information, contact the USS Kidd Veterans Museum.

USS Kidd Veterans Museum
305 South River Road
Baton Rouge, LA 70802
September 8-
December 29, 2018
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Bell County Museum.

Bell County Museum
201 N. Main Street
Belton, TX 76513
September 10, 2018 – January 7, 2019
Exhibition

State Fair is a visual distillation of Arthur Grace's photographic odyssey through fairs in ten states—California, Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Texas, and Virginia. Time and again, regardless of geographical location, Grace's images deftly capture the strange mixture of the traditional, the kitsch, and the off-the-wall that is unique to these annual gatherings, which began as a celebration of rural American life and have evolved into super-sized extravaganzas. State Fair is an exhibition by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at The University of Texas at Austin, presented in partnership with Humanities Texas. For further information regarding this event, please contact the Dr Pepper Museum & Free Enterprise Institute.

Dr. Pepper Museum & Free Enterprise Institute
300 South 5th Street
Waco, TX 76701
September 12 – October 31, 2018
Exhibition

This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition looks at early Texas buildings for information about settlers' visions of community and progress and their accommodation to the physical demands and economic realities of everyday life. For more information, contact the Poundhouse Farmhouse Museum.

Poundhouse Farmhouse Museum
570 Founder's Park Rd.
Dripping Springs, TX 78620
September 14 – October 17, 2018
Exhibition

In the early 1970s, Bill Wittliff visited a ranch in northern Mexico where the vaqueros still worked cattle in traditional ways. Wittliff photographed the vaqueros as they went about daily chores that had changed little since the first Mexican cowherders learned to work cattle from a horse's back. Wittliff captured a way of life that now exists only in memory and in the photographs included in this exhibition. This Humanities Texas traveling exhibition features photographs with bilingual narrative text that reveal the muscle, sweat, and drama that went into roping a calf in thick brush or breaking a wild horse in the saddle. For more information, contact the Harris County Public Library – Lone Star College.

Harris County Public Library
9191 Barker Cypress Road
Cypress, TX 77433
September 17 – December 7, 2018
Exhibition

Through renowned photojournalist James “Spider” Martin's camera and the words of Congressman John Lewis, former head of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), March to Freedom follows a determined group of marchers, both black and white, as they tried on three different occasions in March 1965 to take their cause to the steps of the Alabama Statehouse in Montgomery. March to Freedom is an exhibition by the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at The University of Texas at Austin and the LBJ Presidential Library, presented in partnership with Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information about this event, please contact the Bellevue College Library.

Bellevue College
3000 Landerholm Circle SE
Bellevue, WA 98007

Pages