Upcoming Institutes

Teaching African American History Webinars

In the fall of 2020, Humanities Texas will hold several webinars for secondary-level social studies teachers focused on helping students better understand African American history. 

Like all Humanities Texas teacher programs, these webinars will be content-based and teacher-centered, with an emphasis on teaching with primary sources and developing effective pedagogical strategies. All webinars will align with the TEKS for U.S. history.

Please scroll down to the bottom of this page for a list of scheduled webinars.

Registration

To register for one of the webinars, please complete the online form. All applicants will receive further information via email regarding participation in the webinar.

CPE credit

The online program is free to teachers and their schools. Participants will receive CPE credit and a wealth of curricular materials for each webinar they attend. CPE hours will be based on Zoom attendance and adjusted if a participant misses any portion of the program. Humanities Texas will email CPE letters to participating teachers following the webinar.

Sponsors

These online workshops are made possible with major funding from the State of Texas with ongoing support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.


Citizenship, Slavery, and the U.S. Constitution

Monday, October 26, 2020
5:00–6:15 p.m. CT

The historian James Oliver Horton writes that to understand the nation’s formation, it is essential to address “the contradiction of a freedom-loving people tolerating and profiting from depriving their fellow human beings of freedom.” How did the founders understand race and citizenship? How did debates over slavery shape the development of the U.S. Constitution? How do those debates help students better understand the founding period?

Faculty for this session includes Daina Ramey Berry, professor and chair of the Department of History, and Keffrelyn D. Brown and Anthony L. Brown, professors in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at The University of Texas at Austin. Register now!

Race and Reform in the 1920s

Monday, November 2, 2020
5:00–6:15 p.m. CT

How did American conceptions of race change in the 1920s? How did race figure in discussions over eugenics, nativism, immigration, and social change?

Faculty for this session includes Daina Ramey Berry, professor and chair of the Department of History, and Keffrelyn D. Brown and Anthony L. Brown, professors in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at The University of Texas at Austin. Register now!

Teaching Slavery in the Early Republic

Monday, November 30, 2020
5:00–6:15 p.m. CT

It is difficult for students and teachers to discuss even the most basic facts about slavery in early American history. This webinar will cover the history of slavery in the Early Republic and provide teachers with strategies and resources for teaching this profoundly challenging subject.

Faculty for this session includes Daina Ramey Berry, professor and chair of the Department of History, and Keffrelyn D. Brown and Anthony L. Brown, professors in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at The University of Texas at Austin. Register now!

African Americans and World War II

Monday, December 7, 2020
5:00–6:15 p.m. CT

What were African Americans’ experiences in World War II, both in combat and on the home front? How did their experiences set the stage for the postwar period?

Faculty for this session includes Daina Ramey Berry, professor and chair of the Department of History, and Keffrelyn D. Brown and Anthony L. Brown, professors in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at The University of Texas at Austin. Register now!

The Difference Black History Knowledge Can Make

Thursday, December 3, 2020
5:00–6:30 p.m. CT

This presentation will define essential components of Black history knowledge and the psychological impact of teaching this information to students, particularly those who identify as Black/African American. Particular attention will be given to psychosocial development and how Black history knowledge can positively impact it. Teachers will have an opportunity to receive and discuss TEKS-aligned strategies for effectively implementing such knowledge into their curriculum (with attention given to contemporary issues of racial injustice) as well as potentially helpful (and developmentally appropriate) ways to facilitate productive classroom discussions based on these topics.

Faculty for this session includes Andrea Holman, associate professor of psychology at Huston-Tillotson University, and Collete Chapman-Hilliard of the University of Georgia. Register now!

Questions about Teacher Institutes

Call 512.440.1991 or email institutes@humanitiestexas.org.

Online Educational Resources

Humanities Texas has assembled links to a number of high-quality, online educational resources to supplement the ones that we have developed, such as A President's Vision, Texas Originals, and our Digital Repository. We recommend these websites and online collections for creating lessons and dynamic activities and encouraging a deeper understanding of the humanities.

Humanities Texas Resource Guides

Humanities Texas has developed topically-organized resource guides for teachers of Texas history, eighth-grade U.S. history, eleventh-grade U.S. history, and English language arts.